FINDING YOUR PERFECT MATCH…OF THE CANINE VARIETY!

By Helen Broadley for FidoActive 

May 1 is National Purebred Dog Day and there’s lots to celebrate about dogs, whatever their shape or size!

Often people want a pedigree because they have an affinity with a particular breed through family tradition or they have a specific requirement, such as a ‘no-shedding’ coat because of a human allergy or a specific purpose such as search and rescue. The main difference with a pure breed and a mixed breed is that their lineage is all the same breed. With that comes the knowledge of specific traits in both looks, personality, energy levels, behavior and trainability.

There are undoubtedly some beautiful pure breeds and their attraction is understandable BUT please remember to check with shelters first, such as Petfinder, who have a national register of pure breeds for adoption. https://www.petfinder.com/ 

CURLY

browndog

This handsome boy is a Treeing Walker Coonhound, who arrived at the Pet Adoption Fund in Canoga Park CA with his brother Blue.

They lost their home due to a military family move. They love people and would love a hound-loving home to call their forever home.

They are super friendly, (they even tested well with cats) active and playful but would need a secure fenced yard. Ideally these brothers would love to be re-homed together but, if separated, they would prefer another dog to pal with or someone who is home most of the day.

When I was only 8 years old, my parents rescued an Irish Setter from a breeder who was retiring. Although his intentions were good, his standards were obviously slipping and ‘Rory’ (or “Conqueror of Glen Rory” to give him his proper pedigree name) was looking a bit defeated and underweight, with a lacklustre red coat. His brown eyes melted our hearts.

It was totally unexpected, as we were on vacation when we met him. In fact, we were actually on the way home; the car was packed with Mom and Dad, three kids, our poodle and all our camping gear, talking about our lovely encounter with Rory and none of us could bear the thought of leaving him behind – so my wonderful Dad turned the car around and we went to collect him. We didn’t even notice the cramped journey home, because we were all so besotted with our new family addition (including ‘Pogo’ our Poodle!).

That wonderful dog was both my friend and protector, so Irish Setters will always have a special place in my heart – I would therefore like to share with you a couple of examples of these handsome hounds that are looking for their forever home…

 

BAILEY

browndog2

This handsome 6-year-old Irish Setter is a former AKC show dog, but unfortunately his owner passed away and so he found himself at the ‘Luv Me again’ shelter in Bloomington MN looking for a new home.

How could you resist?

There are, of course, some more challenging cases that find their way to shelters, through no fault of their own. All they normally need is a bit of love, patience and understanding.

 

browndog3

AIDAN

This adorable Irish Setter is a 1-year old pup looking for his forever home. He’s house-trained, neutered and up to date on vaccinations, but needs an adult human prepared to give him the time and training required to undo the bad habits instilled by his previous owner.

I’m sure the rewards would be well worth the effort though!

If you have no luck in your shelter search, then the alternative is to find a RESPONSIBLE breeder – you need to see exactly where your puppy came from and how they were raised.

One way to find the pure breed dog of your dreams is via the American Kennel Club, an organization that has been an advocate for purebred dogs and breeding since its founding in 1884. They have a registry of breeders who adhere to the AKC’s Care and Conditions Policy and undergo regular inspections by the AKC, which ensure both the dogs and the kennels are in tip-top condition. Check this link for available pure bred puppies from AKC Marketplace.

Whichever route you take, I am sure you will find your perfect match and an unconditional love for life!

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Helen Broadley & the FidoActive Team

You can find out more about FidoActive and their all-natural products on their website: www.fidoactive.com

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How To Treat A Dog With Broken Leg

Dog with a broken leg

Wyatt Robinson

Written by Wyatt Robinson

Dogs are considered as one of the most active pets that any pet parent can have. They are generally athletic and full of energy to roam around the house and lawn. This amount of stamina can provide hours of enjoyment and interaction between the dog and its pet parent. However, accidents may happen along the way that may injure a dog. One of the most common types of dog injury is a broken leg due to accidents like vehicular accidents or falls.

Dogs can experience fractures as part of their lives. The most common site for broken bones is the legs, because the legs are the most exposed part of the dog’s body. A dog’s broken leg can be classified as an open or closed type of fracture. Open fractures are fractures that have an open skin and the bone is exposed, while a closed fracture is a fracture where the skin above the broken bones is still intact.

There are also some instances where the involved bone has an incomplete fracture and only exhibits a crack or a sliver. These are called hairline fractures, which are fractures that are less noticeable but is equally painful as the first two general fracture types.

Things to watch for when looking for dogs’ broken bones

An obvious indicator for broken bones is a shard or bone sticking through the skin. However, signs of discomfort and pain after an activity or an accident can also indicate either a dislocation or fracture. Two other signs that there is something wrong are whining and limping, which are clear indicators that the dog is hurt. In addition, the pet parent should be able to check the muscles, ligaments, and tendon injuries because they share symptoms that are similar to breaks.

Dog with injured leg

Greenstick fractures: Greenstick fractures are fractures where the involved bone is still intact but has a crack. This is also called as an incomplete fracture because there is a crack involved that may or may not progress into a complete broken bone.

Compound fractures: Compound fractures are defined as broken bones that involve the skin, where the bone punctures and is exposed. It is important to provide immediate medical attention to dogs that have compound fracture because prolonged exposure without proper treatment can actually lead into serious infection and other complications.

Epiphyseal fractures: Epiphyseal fractures are considered as the fracture more frequently observed in younger, growing dogs. Dogs, especially those that are less than a year old has a soft spot near the ends of long bones where skeletal growth takes place.

The diagnosis that determines epiphyseal plate fracture is sometimes considered as difficult, because the displacement is sometimes minimal and even absent. Injuries that made lead to pain, deformity, or swelling near the base of a long bone of a young dog or a puppy may indicate a probable fracture or epiphyseal plate injury.

The diagnosis is quite a challenge even with the help of an X-ray. A careful review should include growth plate thickness, the deviation of epiphysis from the metaphysis, as well as any possible variation from the contralateral epiphysis. Veterinarians can also observe swelling that involves the soft tissues that signifies trauma if it has occurred to near the location of the epiphysis or growth plate.

X ray broken leg

Injuries that are triggered by impact and crushing force are more difficult to identify because the epiphysis is typically aligned perfectly, while its bony substance has been crushed already. Lack of a diagnosis from a radiographic perspective of epiphyseal injury does not exclude the possibility of a diagnosis with all the potential consequences that surround it.

For puppies that are less than twelve months old, soft areas can be located near the ends of each long bone where growth takes place. These s are referred to as epiphyseal or growth plates. Because these are considered as areas of skeletal growth, epiphyseal plates are rich in immature and underdeveloped non-calcified cells that form a spongy and soft area of the bone.

Growth plates are more prone to fractures these are considered as the weakest parts of the bone, and by adding excess pressure or trauma can easily lead to fracture of varying extent. The humerus, which is the upper front legs, and the distal ends of the femur or the thigh bone are more prone to this type of fracture.

The projection for physeal injuries can pose as an actual problem. Considerable growth disturbance can lead to injury of the epiphyseal plate. Accurate prediction for potential significant problems among dogs is almost impossible. However, there are available guidelines currently available to assist both the veterinarian and the surgeon.

Primary causes of fracture in dogs

A great force or a sudden impact to the dog’s body causes fractures. This can be coming from a particular object, or a fall. While fractures occur more often in more mature dogs, younger dogs are also not exempted from having a broken bone.

Immediate care

Broken bones should be addressed with immediate care to address the pain and decrease the risk of additional complications like infection from the wound. These are the main rules whenever a suspected fracture is observed:

  • Do not try to re-set a fracture.
  • Do not use antiseptics or ointments on open fractures.
  • Get the dog to a vet immediately.

The most common fracture in dogs is a broken limb, and we will focus on how to address such condition.

How to fix a dog’s broken leg will directly depend on the extent of the injury. If necessary, the dog can be muzzled, followed by a clean towel that should be slid gently under the affected limb. If the fracture involves the skin, like in cases of open fracture, the exposed part should be covered by using a clean gauze like a sanitary towel or a bandage.

Remember: Do not apply any antiseptic or ointment on the affected part. While it is considered as a preventive method to inhibit bacteria or possibility to have an infection, it might actually work otherwise and form a more favorable environment for microorganisms that may lodge into the affected site.

In cases where the fracture is a closed fracture, there is no need to apply gauze. The pet owner can use an improvised splint such as a rolled-up magazine, a cardboard, or a newspaper. However, it should be observed if splinting aggravates the injured dog. If it does, do not force the splinting.

Dog's leg bandage injury

In both cases, the broken limb can be supported by using a folded towel. Keep in mind that you should not try to re-set the bone at any circumstances. Splinting allows the prevention of damage to the blood vessels, surrounding tissues, and nerves until the dog receives medical attention from a veterinarian that can provide the needed treatment for the injury with the help of an anesthesia.

Once the dog has been splinted, gently lift the injured dog and transport it as soon as possible to the veterinary clinic. During the time that the dog is in the vehicle, make sure that it is kept warm to prevent additional stress, agitation, and shock.

Immediate veterinary care

The fracture will be examined and promptly treated by the veterinarian. The medical management may include administration of pain relievers or may require general anesthesia in cases of bone re-setting and stabilization. This is the main reason why you should not give an attempt to re-set the broken bone at home because the extent of the damage may not be completely be observed through simple ocular inspection.

Management and living with a recovering dog

Similar to the management and treatment of fractures in humans, dogs can also be applied with casts, pins, plates, and even screws depending on the severity of the fracture. These attachments can be installed to promote bone healing and proper bone alignment. Such attachments can be used depending on the dog’s age, the kind of fracture, and the involved bone. The risk for infection is significantly higher for compound fractures, and is usually accompanied with a different management in both clinic visits and home instructions.

Puppies and young adult dogs can heal broken bones in as little as four to six weeks, depending on how severe the fracture is. Age and physical development plays an important role here because when dogs are younger, the tension and weight that the bones receive are considerably lighter and this allows better healing. Younger dogs also have more active bone cells that speed up the healing process. Thus, a fracture in a young dog or puppy can be treated with a simple cast.

However, the same fracture that an older dog receives may need the help of installed pins, and the healing may take more than eleven to twelve weeks. Simple hairline fractures can be confirmed with fewer tests and physical assessment, while surgical procedures might be needed in cases of more severe fractures. Proper treatment can be determined through the careful evaluation by a veterinarian.

Managing injured dog

The dog’s size, fitness level, and age are some of the primary factors that will determine the prognosis of an injury. After the dog receives the immediate medical attention and treatment, the veterinarian will discuss rehabilitation options and the outlook of the injury. Larger dogs are easier to maintain during their recovery periods, while toy dogs are extremely fragile because a small bump or fall can actually lead to trauma, injury, and even broken bones.

There are cases of broken bones that can heal back to its original form. However, there are also cases, especially the more serious cases of broken bones that will form back into a solid and hardened state, but may manifest deformity. This occurs when a fracture was not properly addressed on time, or there is an overwhelming extent of the injury.

Recovering dogs should not be forced to do test walks and such. Any physical activity that the owner would like the recovering dog to try must be consulted with the veterinarian to avoid the possibility of worsening the injury instead of a more definite recovery time. It is important not to engage the injured dog into any kind of physical activity until the veterinarian approves the resumption of the normal routine.

In conclusion

Broken bones in dogs is one of the more common injuries that a pet parent might deal with during the dog’s lifetime. This may become a traumatic experience for both the dog and its owner, but if you are aware of what should be done to properly address fractures in dogs, you should not worry too much.

http://dogsaholic.com/care/dogs-broken-leg.html

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  How To Treat A Dog With Broken Leg