WILL YOUR FURRY FRIEND BE HOME ALONE THIS 4th JULY?

If so, please make sure they are safe and sound during the celebrations. Facing all of those sudden noises and firework flashes is likely to spook ANY dog, especially when they haven’t got their best friend to lean on! 

 Take them for a walk before it’s dark (cue for start of fireworks!), so they are dog tired. They are less likely to be startled when fast asleep. 

  Ensure they have their ID on at ALL times – even at home! If they get spooked and bolt, they will often just continue running in a bid to escape the noise, which means they could end up a very long way from home, distressed and disorientated. Their ID is essential to help secure a safe and speedy return of your beloved pet. 

  Close the drapes/blinds to dampen sound and mask flashing lights. 

 Switch on radio or TV to mask sound. 

 Ensure they’re comfy in their favorite spot with a blanket and favorite toy to snuggle up to. 

 Keep them occupied with their favorite chew or treat-filled kong. 

#happydogs #happyholidays #doglovers #ilovedogs #petID #lostandfounddog #fidoactive

Wishing you and your canine companions safe and happy celebrations! 

 

 

 

Helen Broadley & The FidoActive Team 

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Is Your Dog Flea Control Up To Scratch?

All You Need To Know About Fleas

You need to do everything that you can to protect your dog from fleas. Your furry friend can get flea allergy dermatitis which affects the skin and can cause excessive itching, scratching and hair loss. This is a very common problem.

If your pooch has fleas they can also suffer from anemia. This can result in pale skin, a shortness of breath, a lack of energy and chills. There are over 300 types of fleas found in the United States and around 2,000 across the world. Fleas are particularly active in the warm summer months.

So What are Fleas?

Fleas are parasitic insects known as “ectoparasites”. They have been around for over 100 million years and are very hardy. This is due to their exoskeleton that is shock resistant and able to withstand high pressures. It takes a lot to kill a flea.

You probably already know that fleas are very good jumpers. They can jump as high as seven inches and as far as thirteen inches. This is the equivalent of a human being able to jump 1,000 feet in the air.

Fleas do not have wings and have three sets of legs. An adult flea is around 1/8 of an inch long (about 3 millimeters). They bite with their mouths and are usually a reddish brown color. It’s not as easy as you would think to see fleas on your pet because of the speed they move at – to be honest, sometimes it’s a bit like finding a needle in a haystack!

What problems can Fleas cause?

If your pooch has a flea infestation then they can be susceptible to some severe health problems. Here are some of the problems that fleas can cause:

1. Flea Allergy Dermatitis is a serious skin problem, can cause excessive itching, scratching and hair loss. This is a very common problem.

2. Anemia – this can result in pale skin, a shortness of breath, a lack of energy and chills.

3. If your dog ingests fleas they can get Tapeworms. A tapeworm is a parasite of the intestines and if this is not treated your furry friend can suffer from malnutrition.

4. Fleas will be a constant source of annoyance for your dog making them want to scratch excessively, which lead to Body Sores.

5. Your furry friend could also contract the Bubonic Plague from fleas as they can transmit Yersina pestis.

How do you know if your Dog has Fleas?

There are a number of signs that you can look for which indicate that your furry friend has fleas. These include:

Scratching a lot more than normal. Watch out for your dog scratching behind their ears, belly or biting their legs, feet or their backsides

Check their skin by parting their fur, to see if there are any pepper like specks. These tend to be black in color. These specks could be flea dirt which is either digested blood or flea excrement. To be sure that the specs are flea dirt you can use a wet cotton tip and to touch the specs. If the tip turns a red color then it’s flea dirt.

 There may not be any obvious signs that your pooch has fleas. Not all dogs are going to bite and scratch if they have fleas. So you will need to inspect the skin of your furry friend near their tail, rump and belly. Try using a flea comb as the really fine teeth will help to expose fleas. You can find flea dirt using a flea comb as well.

How to Treat Dog Fleas

If you find that your pooch has fleas then don’t worry, you will find a number of safe and effective flea treatments readily available. If you need help then ask your vet to recommend a treatment.

CARE: Be sure to follow the instructions on the flea treatment product precisely. A lot of flea treatments contain toxic elements and if you use too much you can harm your furry friend and could potentially even kill them.

How to Prevent your Pooch Getting Fleas

Just like night follows day, no matter how clean your home is, EVERY dog will come into contact with fleas at some point in their lives, but there are a number of things that you can do to help prevent your furry friend from getting any serious infestations or flea related health issues:

 Protect your home from other animals such as rodents as these can carry fleas.

 Check your dog’s coat and skin after any trip outside or if they’ve had any interaction with other dogs.

 Bathe your dog regularly using specialized shampoo.

 Wash soft toys, collars and your pooch’s bedding materials regularly.

If fleas get into your home they can reproduce rapidly and create an infestation in no time. Contact an experienced pest control professional to take care of the fleas as it is unlikely that you will be able to do this effectively yourself.

If you’re anything like me, reading about fleas automatically makes you itch, but there’s no better prompt to go and check your pooch NOW!

Wishing you and your canine companions the best of health – always!

 

 

 

Helen Broadley & The FidoActive Team 

 

 

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How Well Can You Speak Canine?

Dog Body Language

We all want to communicate as much as possible with our furry friends and understanding dog body language is one of the best ways to do this. Your pooch cannot tell you how they are feeling through words so it is vital that you have a good understanding of what their actions and mannerisms mean.

All too often dog owners interpret their pet’s body language incorrectly. They think that an action means their pooch is telling them one thing but in reality they are trying to communicate something else. So we have a comprehensive guide to your dog’s body language for you so that you can better understand what they are trying to tell you.

Start by really knowing your Dog

Before you can start to understand the body language of your furry friend you need to really know them. For example different breeds will adopt different postures and this will have an impact on what they are trying to communicate.

Here are a good couple of examples. A Shih Tzu has the tendency to hold up their tail and you can interpret this as their neutral position. If they deviate from this then the chances are they are trying to communicate something. With a German Shepherd their neutral position is holding their tail down.

You need to look carefully at your dog’s entire posture. It is important that you take any actions with their body parts into context with their posture. There can be subtleties here. If your pooch has floppy ears then it might be difficult for you to spot when they move their ears back just a little bit.

It is entirely possible that your furry friend will change their postures in time. They may begin to display a body posture that communicates fear, but when they discover that this posture is effective this can change to a more confident posture despite the fact that they are still experiencing fear.

Dog Body Language

We felt that the best way for you to learn about the body language of your furry friend was to provide lists of behaviors and actions that demonstrate particular emotions. So this is what you need to look out for when assessing what they are trying to communicate to you:

How to tell if your dog is experiencing Fear or Stress

If your furry friend is feeling stressed out or fearful, the following actions are the most common ways they can communicate this to you:

  • They will move their ears back
  • Their tail will be down or even tucked between their legs (please be aware that certain breeds have their tail down in a neutral posture e.g. greyhounds)
  • They will start to back away
  • They will look away
  • They will have their head down
  • They will start to cower or crouch down
  • They will wrinkle their eyebrows

In addition, they may also display the following characteristics:

  • Trembling (when not cold)
  • Panting (when not hot or thirsty)
  • Refuse to eat
  • Freeze in one position
  • Hide away
  • Pacing around or increasing another activity
  • Lick their muzzle
  • Lift a paw
  • Begin to salivate (when no food around)
  • Yawning (when not tired)
  • Bear their teeth
  • Go to the toilet inappropriately
  • Express their anal glands which normally produces a nasty fish like smell
  • Widen their eyes which enlarges their pupils

How to tell if your dog is feeling Confident

You obviously want your furry friend to feel confident rather than fearful or stressed. Here are the typical signs of confidence:

  • They have their ears forward
  • Their tail is up (remember than in some breeds this is the neutral position)
  • When they stand they are straight up
  • Their eye contact is direct
  • Their head is held high
  • Their mouth is open a little and they expose their tongue

These are all signs that your dog does not feel threatened by anything or anybody around them. You can usually approach a pooch displaying these characteristics without any concern.

How to tell if your dog is Alert/Curious

Dogs are curious creatures and they will usually want to check things out that they have not encountered before. So, if your furry friend has discovered something that interests them, they are likely to display some or all of the characteristics below. It’s their way of telling you that they are paying attention and making an assessment of a certain situation.

  • Ears are forward and may be twitching if they are trying to detect a specific sound
  • Mouth is closed
  • Wide eyes
  • Forehead and nose are smooth
  • Tail is horizontal but not bristled or stiff

How to tell if your dog is feeling Happy

If the body language of your pooch is relaxed then this is probably a sign that they are happy. This is what you need to look out for as signs of happiness:

  • Mouth partially open with a soft look
  • Relaxed ears that are not taut or pulled back
  • Posture is relaxed overall with head raised, a confident stance and tail relaxed
  • Wagging of the tail which includes wiggles from the whole body. Tail wagging with a relaxed body also suggests happiness
  • Showing you their belly by rolling over
  • Bowing down ready to play with their bottom in the air and chest pressed against the ground

Results will vary by breed but in general if your furry friend is exhibiting these signs then you can confidently assume that they are happy. At the end of the day it is all about your pooch appearing to be at ease and comfortable.

How to tell if your dog is feeling Sad/Lonely

Your pooch is not going to cry when they are sad. But they can exhibit other signs of sadness or loneliness. Check for this body language to see if your furry friend is feeling sad or lonely:

  • They make a whimpering or whining sound
  • Generally moping around not enjoying things that they normally do
  • Energy levels down
  • No interest in treats or other food
  • Smaller eyes that may look squinty
  • Patterns of sleep are different from normal

Of course, this kind of behavior can be a sign that your pooch is unwell. Try to make your furry friend happier by going for a walk, playing with a toy that they love, giving them their favorite treat and letting them play with another dog that they like. If they are still sad then consult your vet.

How to tell if your dog is feeling Angry

Of course you don’t want your furry friend to be angry but sometimes this is going to happen just as it does with us. These are the tell-tale body language signs:

  • A threatening stance standing as big as possible
  • Body upright and stiff with fur standing on end
  • Ears flattened and eyes not blinking
  • Open mouth and drawn back lips with the baring of their teeth
  • In an attack position ready to lunge
  • Low growling that is threatening

If you see these signs in your pooch then don’t do anything to make the situation worse. Do not stare at them or try to provoke them in any way. Be careful with sudden movements and keep your distance. Your furry friend may just need a little time to cool off but, if this behavior continues, it may be because they are actually injured and they are simply displaying their natural self-protection mechanism.

We hope that this guide will help you to better understand your dog’s body language. Always remember that certain breeds will act slightly differently but, over time, you will get to know your dog better than anyone, what makes them tick and what ticks them off!

It’s amazing how our furry best friend can sense and willingly provide emotional support whenever we need it, so it’s only fair we do the same for them. That’s what makes the special unbreakable bond between you.

It’s amazing how our furry best friend can sense and provide emotional support whenever we need it, so it’s only fair we do the same for them

Wishing you and your canine companions the best of health!

 

 

 

Helen Broadley & the FidoActive Team

 

 

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Take the Strain out of Traveling with your Furry Friend!

Whether it be by train, plane or automobile, traveling with our furry friends can be a fun experience but it can also be stressful and dangerous!So here are some top travel tips to help make holidaying with your hound easier and safer for you both!

Expect the Unexpected

You may be one of the lucky people that have never had a car accident but please still read on, as most people will have a couple of scrapes at some point in their lives. No matter how good a driver you are, you can’t always foresee hazards on the road, whether that be flood water, an animal or person running out in front of you or other irresponsible drivers on the road.

Even stopping suddenly at 10 M.P.H. your beloved pet is at risk of injury-but this doesn’t have to be the case. There are a number of easy and inexpensive precautions to significantly reduce the risks and help keep both you and your furry traveling companion safe.

Top 10 Tips for Safe & Happy Canine Car Journeys  

#1 Don’t let your dog roam around the inside of the car. They can impede your driving and distract you – just like kids! If you have to stop or swerve suddenly, they can immediately become a high velocity projectile (just like a bullet from a gun!) and thrown into the dashboard, windshield, the back of a seat or the head of the person in front. At the very least your pet will suffer emotional distress, worsened by cuts, bruises and broken bones from blunt force trauma. 

#2 Never let them sit in your lap or on the edge of your set next to an open window. Not only does this impede your driving, if you stop short or have a head-on impact, they can be crushed between you and the steering wheel, injured by airbags or ejected from the car into moving traffic. 

#3 Don’t let your dog roam unsecured in the back of a truck. Secure a crate to the bed of the truck and keep your dog inside of it. The risks posed to those furry friends are 100 times greater than those loose inside of a vehicle. 

#4 Dogs should stay restrained in the backseat or cargo area of your vehicle.  A metal separator is not enough to keep your pet safe; that really only prevents them from jumping into the seat in front and hitting the dashboard in a sudden stop or accident. It won’t prevent injury if your vehicle rolls or is impacted and if the window is open in their space, they can still be ejected. 

There are many good safety harnesses and crates available today which prevent this kind of injury to your pets. 

Safety Harnesses – These come in a range of price and quality but try to invest in one that is sturdy, padded for comfort and designed for automobile use. And remember to use it on even the shortest of journeys as, sadly, most accidents occur close to home. The harness should be on a short enough tether to anchor them in the event of an accident or sudden stop, but long enough to allow your dog room to stand up, turn around, move a bit from side to side and lay down when they want. 

Crates  Many dogs, especially nervous or new travelers are often more at ease in crates. Buy the sturdiest crate you can, preferably crash-tested and approved. Place it in the car with the long side against the seat back, to avoid extreme impact on one part- possibly the head- of the animal in case of a crash. Then secure it not only with the seatbelt but also with a couple of wide, heavy-duty luggage straps. You might have a mechanic install anchors for these.

In the case of small dogs, placing the crate behind the front seats on the floor is reasonably safe but somehow anchoring it there is even better. This may require having bolts put in the car specifically for this purpose, like you would in the back of a truck.

Finally, fit it with their favorite blanket and favorite toy, so it feels more like home.

#5 Opening car windows is great for ventilation and feeling the wind through their fur but make sure your pooch can’t jump out if they see something they’d like to chase. 

Avoid letting your dog stick their head or paws out of the car. Just like humans on a motorcycle, their    head and eyes exposed to high speeds and wind without protection are at risk to dangerous highway debris or obstacles. Remind yourself of a time when a stone was kicked up from the road and hit your windscreen, when a bush or tree branch scratched the side of your car, when you’ve had to pass a wide truck and only had a hair’s breadth between your wing mirrors, or when a motorcyclist has come speeding up between you and the other lane… then imagine your beloved pet’s face sticking out and being hit by one of those things… Seriously, I know it makes for a great photo but your beloved pet doesn’t know the dangers. They rely on you to keep them safe and it’s just not worth the risk! 

So, keep the air conditioning on, or just crack the windows, to let the air flow instead and let your dog get some fresh air on your regular pit stops – store up the fun for your vacation together!

#6 Keep their collar and tags on. It might seem more comfortable for your pup to have his collar off in the car, but if you crash and your dog panics, he may run away. Not everyone checks for microchips, so that little tag is still the best way to ensure their safe return. 

#7 For longer car rides, remember your pup needs food, water and breaks too. Feed your dog a small meal a few hours before your trip, then make regular stops for water/food every hour or two, or when Fido gets overly restless; this will give you both a chance to stretch your legs. When travelling in high temperatures, you’ll need to stop more often, about every 30 minutes to offer your pooch water. These breaks are especially important if it’s your pet’s first car trip, or they don’t like cars because a stressed and nervous dog runs a higher risk of dehydration than a calm pet.

#8 Not all dogs like the car; some associate it with trips to the vet or groomer and others are simply of a nervous disposition. Newly adopted pets may become car sick or nervous due to a previous unknown trauma. Exercise them prior to the journey, so they get rid of excess energy and are ready for a rest. 

Have a batch of specific treats your pooch really loves and use them ONLY for car journeys, so that it builds a positive association with the car. 

Weather permitting, rolling down the window a little closest to your dog will help distract them by smelling the air around them and also assists with limiting nausea. Better still, for their first journey, get another person to hold and comfort them, especially if they’re not in a secured crate. 

Nervous dogs often prefer being enclosed in a crate as it feels like a den and covering it with a dark blanket reduces the motion they can see through the windows and makes them feel more snug, safe & secure.

#9 If you can’t afford a safety harness or crate, you can always loop a strong, thick leash through the seatbelt to restrict your dog from moving around and while it may not be 100% effective, it lessens the risk significantly and something is better than nothing! 

#10 Put down a towel or sheet on your back seat, to protect it from muddy paws, hair and toenail snagging. Also, if your dog is prone to car sickness, you won’t be distracted or worried if they vomit and you can just pull over at your earliest opportunity.

Flying With Your Furry Friend? 

 Learn the airline’s pet policy. There are often fees associated with flying your pup and certain breeds are almost never allowed to fly or only allowed to fly seasonally. Some airlines have a strict ‘No canine passengers’ policy. 

 The ideal is to travel with your pet in the cabin but if your furry friend won’t fit under your seat, a crate is be the best option. But make sure you select a specially approved travel carrier to ensure your best friend’s safety and comfort. The carrier should be large enough for your pet to stand, sit and turn around comfortably.

 Prepare your dog for hours alone in a crate. Practice with your dog and the crate several weeks before the flight date, so that they associate their crate with positive experiences and seem happy to spend some time in their crate alone with you nearby.  Leave the crate out in your home with the door open and with their usual comfortable bedding and favorite toy in it. Feed your dog with the crate door open and work your way up to feeding with the door closed. Keep the same blanket & toy in the crate, to provide warmth and comfort for the duration of the flight. 

• If your pooch has to be checked into the belly of the plane, consider freezing a bowl of water. This way, it won’t spill when you’re transporting it, but will have melted by the time the dog gets thirsty. It’s also worth taping a small pouch, preferably made of cloth, of dried food outside the crate, so that airline personnel will be able to feed your pet in case he gets hungry on long-distance flights or a layover.

Camping 

• Camping is one of the most popular vacation activities for furry families but don’t let your pooch run loose unsupervised. With so many new smells to explore in the great outdoors, it can be exciting for a dog, but there are also dangers to be aware of, from wild animals, to steep drops, to poisonous plants. It’s better to be safe than sorry, so keep your dog on a leash during a camping trip. 

• Stay close at night. Though it may not be appealing to have a dirty pup that’s been playing in the woods all day asleep beside you, a dog tied up outside risks weather and wild animal hazards (for you both!), so keep them in the tent, cabin or RV with you. 

Hotels /Lodgings 

• Check the hotel/motel policy on pets before booking. If you are bringing your dog to a hotel, do some planning. Nothing is worse than trying to check into a hotel after an exhausting journey, only to discover that your extra-large pooch does not meet their size or breed restrictions. 

• Bring your dog’s crate or a dog bed from home if it’s practical, as it will be familiar to your dog and will help make them feel more comfortable in an unfamiliar environment. By having a crate, your dog has a piece of home, and a place to stay when you aren’t in the room. Make sure to train your dog before the trip, so it will be used to the crate. 

• If your dog is allowed to stay at a hotel, respect other guests, staff and the property. I know it’s hard to believe, but not everyone loves dogs!

• Keep your dog as quiet as possible and do not leave them unattended. Many dogs will bark or destroy property if left alone in a strange place. 

• Ask the management where you should walk your dog and ensure you pick up their poop. 

• Remember that one bad experience with a dog guest may result in the hotel management asking them to leave and potentially refuse to allow any dogs in the future. Be considerate of others and leave your room and the grounds as you found them. 

Health and Safety 

• Arrange a check-up with your veterinarian before going on an extended trip. Make sure all their vaccinations are up to date and bring the shot records with you. Health certifications are required for airline travel. 

• To keep your dog healthy as you travel and help get them settled in to unfamiliar surroundings, bring along a supply of their regular food and treats. Be sure to bring any medications they need and usual supplements to keep them in tip top condition. 

Identification 

In the event that your dog gets away from you on your trip, you can increase the chances of a safe and swift recovery by making sure they can be properly identified: 

• Be sure your dog has a sturdy leash and collar. The collar should have identification tags with the dog’s name, your name, and your telephone number, as well as proof of rabies shots. Remember to attach a temporary tag with details of your vacation address and contact number too.

• Consider a permanent form of identification, such as a microchip.

• Bring a recent picture of your dog along with you.

Additional Things to Pack 

• Paper towels, stain and odor remover and anything else you need to clean up after any accidents. 

• Plenty of poop bags. 

• A bowl, plenty of water, and some treats. 

• Seat covers (an old towel or blanket with plastic bags underneath works) if you want to protect your car from stains, hair and toenail scratches. 

• Make sure you have at least 3 days’ worth of food and any medication your pet needs, a warm blanket, towels, a pet first-aid kit and toys, in case you get stuck on the road due to adverse weather, major traffic incidents or if your vehicle breaks down.  

 

Wishing you and your canine companions happy travels!

Helen & The FidoActive Team
About the Author:

Helen Broadley is co-founder of FidoActive, a small business of life-long dog owners and dog lovers who have been motivated, by their own experiences, to create superior, all-natural products that promote good health in all canine companions. Helen has been surrounded by dogs since her childhood and been a dog parent all her adult life – from pedigrees to mutts – but she loves them all the same! 

She regularly volunteers at animal shelters, often having that as her main vacation activity. FidoActive also supports the amazing work of many community rescue shelters across the USA through product donations, to help get their furry residents in tip-top condition whilst waiting for their forever home.  

The FidoActive team believe wholeheartedly that the best way to reward their best friends’ unconditional love and loyalty is by helping them to have a healthy, happy and active life. 

Fidomeans faithful & loyal– a quality that your dog gives unconditionally 

Activeis what we want every dog to be! 

 

 

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Doggie Dental Hygiene – The Root of Many Evils

Your furry friend relies on you to provide the dental care that they need. The good news is that your dog will not suffer with a similar number of cavities like we do. The bad news is  that they do suffer with similar dental problems such as gingivitis and plaque.  

In fact, The American Veterinary Medical Association reported that 4 out of 5 dogs over the age of three have some form of gum disease. 

If these dental problems are not treated, then this can lead to far worse problems, such as kidney disease, liver and heart problems. So, it is essential that you take care of your dog’s teeth and this article will provide the tips and advice that you need to do just that. 

Clean your Dog’s Teeth Properly 

If you have never cleaned your furry friend’s teeth before then you are in for a treat! They will not be excited about it at all and you need to be a bit cunning to get the job done. It is best to go for teeth cleaning when your pooch is tired – say after a long walk. They will be a lot happier to sit and let you wield the toothbrush. 

Start the teeth cleaning process slowly and speak soothingly to your pet as you make each attempt. If you do not manage an effective clean the first time around don’t worry – keep practicing every day until you get it right. Honestly, they will get used to it eventually if you persevere and like any training, remember to use positive reinforcement. I know it sounds strange to give them a treat after cleaning their teeth, but it’s not like giving your kid a sweet after they’ve cleaned theirs. Alternatively, you can give them their favorite toy to play with.  

The earlier you start teeth cleaning the better. If your dog is older then they will take to it eventually. If you have a puppy then start straight away.  

CARE: NEVER use human toothpaste for the job as it will contain fluoride which is dangerous for dogs. Be sure to buy special dog tooth paste for the job – and if you get a particularly stubborn hound who doesn’t like fresh minty breath, you can even get flavored toothpaste, so they think they’re actually getting something tasty whilst you’re doing the dreaded deed! 

How eating and chewing benefits doggie dentures 

It is even more important to clean your dog’s teeth regularly if they eat wet food rather than dry food. The reason is that wet food can stick to their teeth and cause decay more easily. 

Your dog can clean their teeth through the act of chewing hard dental and hard rubber or nylon chew toys also massage their gums and exercise their oral structures. A nice bone to chew on will also help get rid of tartar build up and strengthen your dog’s teeth.  

Look out for these possible dental problems 

If you are brushing the teeth and you notice blood or your pooch cries out in pain then this is a sure sign they probably have a problem that needs professional attention. 

Try to check inside your dog’s mouth regularly – like once every week. There are a number of symptoms that can indicate dental hygiene problems and these include: 

  • Your canine has suddenly changed their eating habits 
  • They are drooling excessively 
  • You can see that they have a tooth missing 
  • Their gums look swollen, overly red or there are signs of bleeding 
  • You can see growths in their mouth 
  • They have really bad breath 
  • They have started to paw at their mouth 

If you spot any of these then it is time to take your pet for a check-up with the doggie dentist! You should visit the veterinarian at least once a year for an overall health check-up anyway and this will include an oral check, but please don’t delay until the annual appointment, if your pooch displays any of the above signs.  

Us humans clean our teeth twice a day, so it should be no surprise that it’s recommended we clean our dog’s teeth once a day. But, in case you do skip it now and again, the daily addition of a dental hygiene chew to a regimen of tooth brushing every other day has been proven to reduce the risk of gingivitis and accumulation of dental deposits (plaque, calculus and stain). There are lots of suitable chews available on the market in various shapes and sizes – my dog loves getting his teeth into Dentastix or Greenies and they certainly seem to do the trick. 

Help your pooch by paying particular attention to their dental care – it will avoid painful problems for them and save you a lot of unnecessary expense. That’s a win win in my book! 

Wishing you and your canine companions the best of health! 

 

 

 

Helen Broadley & The FidoActive Team  

 

 

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