If Pets Had Thumbs Day

The 74 Texts Your Pets Would Send On “If Pets Had Thumbs Day”

Another day, another silly, contrived holiday. Just as Monday was Old Stuff Day and Wednesday is Scrapbooking Day, today, March 3 is “If Pets Had Thumbs Day”.

The point of “If Pets Had Thumbs Day”, along with serving as blog fodder, is for pet owners everywhere to take a little time to consider what their pet would do if they had opposable thumbs, like humans. Opposable thumbs are the evolutionary development that allowed us to become a tool-making species, invent fire, and, yes, domesticate animals. The point is to remind pet parents that their cat might use a can opener to open some tuna, or that their dog might hitchhike to the dog park, but of course they can’t, so you, pet owner, need to open that tuna, or take Matilda to the dog park.

But, we can’t help but wonder what our pets might text us, if they had thumbs. After all, that’s what we use ours for, most often. Here are the 74 texts your pets would send today, if they had thumbs…

Your Dog:

1.     Where did you go?

2.     Where are you?

3.     Where are you?

4.     What are you doing?

5.     Where are you?

6.     When are you coming home?

7.     Where are you?

8.     I’m bored.

9.     I’m bored.

10.  Where are you?

11.  *Sunglasses Emoji*

12.  Hey, can you pick up some treats on your way home?

13.  I miss you.

14.  Where are you?

15.  Where are you?

16.  Think I might take a lil nap, just didn’t want you to worry if you text and I don’t text right back.

17.  Where are you?

18.  What are you doing?

19.  I heard somebody outside and thought it might be you. Was it you?

20.  Gotta pee.

21.  What are you doing?

22.  What are you doing?

23.  Hey, I miss you.

24.  I love you.

25.  I’m sorry about what happened last night.

26.  Are you mad at me?

27.  Where are you?

28.  What do you want to do tonight?

29.  You’re my best friend.

30.  *Wink/tongue out Emoji*

31.  I miss you.

32.  Sooooo borrrrred.

33.  Really gotta pee now.

34.  I miss you.

35.  What are you doing?

36.  Where did you go?

37.  When are you coming back?

38.  There are some birds in the backyard. Just thought you would want to know.

39.  I love you.

40.  When are you coming back?

41.  Maybe this weekend we can go on a reaaaally long walk.

42.  Did I ever tell you thanks for that new toy with the squeaky thing?

43.  Thanks.

44.  Where are you?

45.  Gonna take another nap… just letting you know!

46.  Where are you?

47.  When are you coming home?

48.  I miss you.

49.  Hungry.

50.  *Kissface Emoji*

51.  I miss you.

52.  Why don’t you ever text back??

53.  First you leave, now you don’t text back.

54.  You’re being shady.

55.  Are there other dogs out there that you would prefer to spend your time with!?

56.  I’m sorry, I don’t mean it. I trust you.

57.  I love you.

58.  I’m sorry.

59.  I love you.

60.  Where are you?

61.  Where are you?

62.  When are you coming home?

63.  OK, I’ve been trying to hold it, but I did let out a couple dribbles. Sry.

64.  I love you.

65.  What’s for dinner? Same old, same old?

66.  Maybe you could let me have a couple bites of what you’re having?

67.  We can talk about it when you get home.

68.  Speaking of which…

69.  When are you coming home?

70.  Where are you?

71.  Nap 3.0 on deck… Just so you know, in case you text and it doesn’t wake me up.

72.  Thought I heard a text come in, but there’s nothing new. Just checking to see if you texted and it got deleted somehow?

73.  Where are you?

74.  I love you.

Your Cat:

1. …

http://thesurge.com/stories/the-74-texts-your-pets-would-send-on-if-pets-had-thumbs-day

You and your best friend don’t have to live with pain!

Our product covers dogs of all ages and breeds, which encounter joint problems with age, need some post-op help to regain mobility or highly active dogs suffering from joint inflammation and pain after a hard day on the job or the trail. FidoActive Advanced Hip and Joint Supplement for Dogs supports joint health for dogs to get your four-legged friend back on their paws again. Get Fido active again the simple, safe way and treat your dog to a long & active life! Shop now and enjoy 10% off!!!

Amazon Link – here

Learn More About FidoActive- here

Home Care: How To Clean Your Dog’s Teeth

Home oral hygiene can make a tremendous difference in your dog’s comfort and health.  There are several home care oral hygiene options from which to choose, but keep in mind that anything you can do to help prevent plaque and tartar accumulation will pay big dividends. What really matters is whether or not home oral hygiene will be provided over the long haul – considerable effort applied only for a short period or only occasionally will be of no long-term benefit.

Listed below some commonly used options for home oral hygiene that have been proven to be of benefit for dogs. Combining several methods will achieve the best results.  All methods of home oral hygiene share the goal of preventing or controllingperiodontal disease by minimizing plaque (bacterial film) accumulation, and preventing the mineralization of the plaque to form calculus (“tartar”).

BRUSHING and TOOTH-PASTES: Brushing your dog’s teeth is the single most effective means to maintain oral health between professional dental examinations. This makes sense because the bacterial film known as “plaque” is the cause ofperiodontal disease. This film is easily disrupted by the simple mechanical effect of brushing the teeth. Frequent (ideally daily) brushing is recommended to maintain optimal dental health. Almost all dogs will eventually accept brushing. The key to success is to be patient and gradual in your approach, brushing mainly the outsides of the “cheek teeth” located under the upper lip. A dog that resists brushing frequently may have painful areas in the mouth that need to be addressed.

A variety of products safe for pets are available in the marketplace. If you use a brush and a dentifrice, AVDC recommends pet-specific toothpastes. These come in flavors that dogs accept, such as poultry and seafood. Avoid human toothpastes as they often contain abrasives and high-foaming detergents that should not be swallowed or inhaled by dogs.

Toothbrushes designed for dogs are soft and angled to assist in brushing the back teeth. Some dogs prefer finger brushes. A variety of “dental wipes” containing different products are available. The single-use wipes are rubbed daily on the outside of the teeth to remove plaque.

                               Fig 1. Brushing a dog’s teeth

CHLORHEXIDINE ORAL RINSE and GEL: Chlorhexidine is the most effective anti-plaque antiseptic. Chlorhexidine binds to the oral tissues and tooth surfaces, and is gradually released into the oral cavity. It is safe for pets and rarely causes problems, though it does have a bitter taste if palatability enhancers suitable for dogs are not included. Some dogs may object to the taste of products containing chlorhexidine while others accept it with no difficulty. The rinse is applied by squirting a small amount inside the cheek on each side of the mouth. The gel is applied by smearing it onto the teeth. The tongue and lips will spread the rinse or gel around the mouth.

DIETS and CHEWS:  Several “dental diets” have been shown to be of benefit in decreasing dental disease. Some employ a specific kibble design and others include a chemical anti-tartar poly-phosphate ingredient.

Rawhide products and chew treats can be helpful if chewed daily, and some rawhide chews and biscuits contain an anti-tartar ingredient. Palatability is important – chewing every day is the ideal.

Dogs are carnivores – they chew on bones in the wild. However, AVDC does not recommend cow hooves, dried natural bones or hard nylon products because they are too hard and do not mimic the effect of a dog tearing meat off a carcass. These hard products are associated with broken teeth or damaged gums.

Chew toys are only of benefit if they are played with frequently and over the long haul – you can increase the dog’s willingness to chew by smearing palatable peanut butter or soft cheese on the product.

Pet dogs should be monitored while chewing a chew treat or toy, as they may swallow large pieces, leading to a variety of digestive system disorders.

The Veterinary Oral Health Council (VOHC) Seal of Acceptance is awarded to home oral hygiene products that meet or exceed the VOHC standard for retarding accumulation of dental plaque or dental tartar. A complete listing of products that have been granted the VOHC Seal of Acceptance is available at www.VOHC.org – click the Products Awarded the VOHC Seal link. The VOHC web site also features additional information about dental disease in pets, and there are other pages on the AVDC web site that may be helpful (periodontal disease, professional dental scaling, anesthesia-free dental scaling)

AVDC Diplomates are familiar with available home oral hygiene products and can help tailor a specific home care regimen best suited to you and your pet.

http://www.avdc.org/carefordogs.html

You and your best friend don’t have to live with pain!

Our product covers dogs of all ages and breeds, which encounter joint problems with age, need some post-op help to regain mobility or highly active dogs suffering from joint inflammation and pain after a hard day on the job or the trail. FidoActive Advanced Hip and Joint Supplement for Dogs supports joint health for dogs to get your four-legged friend back on their paws again. Get Fido active again the simple, safe way and treat your dog to a long & active life! Shop now and enjoy 10% off!!!

Last Few Days To Take Advantage of 10% Valentine’s Discount

Coupon Code : K37RCTMZ

Amazon Link – here

Learn More About FidoActive- here

Dental Home Care For Dogs

Helpful Tips Walking With Your Reactive Dog

reactive dog

If you’re anything like me the simple task of taking your dog out for a walk can be quite a challenge. Over the past couple years we’ve made a lot of progress following these steps. Sure – it’s not perfect – there’s always going to be unpredictable circumstances, but it’s made a huge difference.

Walking Your Reactive Dog

Walking your reactive dog isn’t generally a nice or relaxing experience, but there are ways to make it easier. Unfortunately for us reactive dog owners we’ve had to put so much effort into avoiding situations that might set our dogs off we become mentally tired before the walk even begins.

Reactive dogs are hard to control. When you get looks from strangers wondering “why can’t she control her dog?” it’s a pretty disheartening feeling. Trust me – we’re working on it. You need to be able to move past the fact that you’re going to get dirty looks.

People that have never owned a reactive dog can be clueless when it comes to the time and effort required to treat reactivity. It’ is embarrassing – but in order to make progress you’ve got to get out there and work on it. Ignore the dirty looks and remember you’re doing this for your dog – not for your neighbors approval.

Owning a reactive dog is a liability. If you’re not comfortable training with your dog I highly suggest seeking out a professional trainer that’s worked with reactive dogs. Trainers that use positive training techniques and desensitization methods can work wonders for reactive dogs.

It’s Going to Take Time and Commitment

The best piece of advice I can give when it comes to walking your reactive dog is to stick with it. Whether you only make it a block or 10 miles in a day doesn’t matter. If you have many bad experiences because you’re moving too fast for the dog you’ll end up back at the beginning.

Start out slow and find out which techniques work best for your dog. Once you’ve got a decent technique it’s then time to gradually increase their exposure. Desensitization is a long process; training your dog to walk without incident is something you build on.

Unfortunately there is no perfect formula or overnight trick to guarantee a great, uneventful walk for you and your reactive dog. There’s a few tricks and techniques you can try; they’ve all helped Laika to varying degrees.

Make The Threat A Positive Experience

Letting your dog know that good things happen when they get close to their trigger is what’s worked best for Laika. Remember that your dog is under stress when she’s being reactive, try and communicate to them that nothing bad is going to happen.

It’s accomplished easily with their favorite treat and your handy dog clicker. For Laika I make sure we have some carrots or snap peas on hand. I know I’ve gotten too close when she immediately spits them out and stays focused on the approaching person, dog, bike etc. When this happens we turn back around and go back to finding her comfort threshold. The threshold is the point at which she isn’t exhibiting any signs of stress. Don’t be afraid to overpraise; if your dog is remaining calm while in the sights of another dog feed her treats like crazy and praise often. I’d recommend watching this great video by Kikopup who demonstrates calming behaviors you can practice when walking with your reactive dog.

Repeat Until Your Dog Believes It

Your dog needs to believe that other dogs (or whatever they’re reactive towards) make great things happen. Some discomfort for your dog is going to lead to a lot of praise, play, treats, and affection. Whatever your dog is most motivated by.

Training your reactive dog while walking is by no means a quick and easy process. It sounds easy enough but being able to actually implement it enough times to see tangible results will take some time. Remember that patience is a virtue.

If you remain consistent with the constant praise, clicks, and treats while your dog is nearing their threshold you’ll eventually begin to see a difference in their emotional response. Their reactivity may not ever be completely gone but you can learn a lot about their specific boundaries by constantly practicing this technique.

Choice Training

This technique is closely related to choice training, which is another popular way to train yourreactive dog to walk on a leash. You praise your dog whenever they make the choice to remain calm and well behaved in the stressful situation. It relies on catching behaviors you like and praising them for the choices they’ve made.

Failures Will Happen

If your dog becomes overly aroused it means you pushed too far, too fast, simply back up a few more feet next time and start again. It takes a lot of time to desensitize a dog to their stressors, don’t become discouraged if it doesn’t work quickly. Failure is always going to be a part of training, but it also helps us learn to improvise. I failed yesterday when I decided Laika and I should go meet some horses. Lesson learned, my reactive dog doesn’t like horses.

Keep it Unpredictable To Keep Your Dogs Attention

Incorporate something unpredictable and fun into your walk. Change your pace, switch directions. Praise your dog as they follow your lead. This will help build their interest in what you’re doing rather then focusing on what may possibly lie ahead. If your dog doesn’t give you a lot of attention on your walks this is a great exercise to gain their interest and focus, it’ll also make your future training sessions easier.

Teach Your Dog To Target You

Teach your dog to touch or target you with a specific cue. For Laika I use the ever so original phrase “touch” as I put out my right hand. When I see something up ahead that I’d like to avoid I’ll start to walk backwards and say “touch.” Laika may not know why I’m suddenly walking backwards, but she gladly turns around and comes running back to me. And of course she’s rewarded handsomely. I can then decide how best to handle the upcoming dog while I’ve got her full attention.

Avoid What Cannot Be Won

If you ever find yourself unsure about a certain situation the easiest way to avert a problem is avoidance. It’s not really a training technique, it’s just a way to keep things under control when you’re not feeling confident about confronting the situation. Safety should always be on your mind when you’re walking a reactive dog; if you don’t feel like you can handle the situation it’s best to avoid it.

As soon as you see a potential trigger for your reactive dog you can choose to walk the other way. You can also use things such as parked cars or bushes to create a barrier between your dog and the trigger. You can also just sit and tell your dog to stay until the other dog has passed. Not all battles are worth fighting.

Ask A Friend For Help

I’d also suggest incorporating the help of a friend. If you’re not confident in your ability to maintain control while walking your reactive dog just having another person with you can do wonders for your ability to manage stressful situations. Sometimes the other person might even help keep your dog interested, especially if they’re also carrying treats.

Consult A Dog Behaviorist

Seeking out the help of a dog behaviorist is something I’ve done. When I first got Laika I had never had to deal with leash reactivity and resource guarding, so I got help from a dog behaviorist. It’s especially nice to have someone on your side who isn’t going to pass judgment on your dog. It didn’t cure Laika, but I learned so much and gained confidence in my own ability to manage my dog, it was certainly worth it.

Use a Dog Backpack or Harness

I recommend using a backpack or harness for any dog whether they’re reactive or not. If you’ve ever had problems getting your dog to walk calmly a good backpack or harness can work wonders.

When I use a backpack on my own reactive dog her focus changes. She’s not interested in the squirrel a mile away or all those crazy car noises. She becomes attentive to me and focuses on the job at hand – walking. The same goes for a proper harness. To keep your dog from pulling buy a harness that clips in the front; when you use a back clip harness it’s actually encouraging your dog to pull more.

It Gets Better With Practice and Consistency

It’s embarrassing and frustrating to walk a reactive dog, but it can get better. With dog training as with many other things you get what you put in, and one size doesn’t fit all. Not all techniques will work for you and your dog. Find the tricks that work best to keep your dog calm and relaxed on walks. With enough quality training you’ll find that you’ve got yourself a much closer bond with your dog and not to mention a more relaxed walking buddy.

Once you start to see improvements you’ll notice that you’re able to focus more on the walk, rather than the reactive dog at your side. Eventually you might even find yourself able to take a deep breath, relax, and enjoy the scenery.

reactive dog walk

Look at these non reactive, happy dogs/This Year’s Love

This post is part of the Training Tips Tuesday blog hop, hosted by DOGthusiast and TiffanysDiamond Dogs
Linky Tools subscription expired. List not available.

http://www.puppyleaks.com/walking-your-reactive-dog/

 

You and your best friend don’t have to live with pain!

Our product covers dogs of all ages and breeds, which encounter joint problems with age, need some post-op help to regain mobility or highly active dogs suffering from joint inflammation and pain after a hard day on the job or the trail. FidoActive Advanced Hip and Joint Supplement for Dogs supports joint health for dogs to get your four-legged friend back on their paws again. Get Fido active again the simple, safe way and treat your dog to a long & active life! Shop now and enjoy 10% off!!!

Last Few Days To Take Advantage of 10% Valentine’s Discount

Coupon Code : K37RCTMZ

Amazon Link – here

Learn More About FidoActive- here

Helpful Tips Walking With Your Reactive Dog

 

Best Hypoallergenic Small Dog Breeds

Best small breed hypoallergenic dogs

Today we are covering the best small breed hypollargenic dogs

Do you find yourself sneezing and having running and itching eyes and nose around dogs?  Ever wanted a four legged friend but have settled for the fact that you just can not have one due to how they affect you?  No need to pass on man’s best friend, there are many small breed hypoallergenic dogs out there for you and your family to choose from.  Here are just a few!

SMALL BREED HYPOALLERGENIC DOGS

West Highland White Terrier: Alert, friendly and active, this would be a great addition to a family with kids.  Small in size and big on personality!  They are commonly referred to as a ‘Westie’ or ‘Westy’. Westies have a lifespan of about 12-16 years. They do require grooming due to their long hair, but do not shed.

Small Breed Hypoallergenic dogs: Schnauzer

Schnauzer: Another great choice for families with children.  By nature, they are protective and energetic.  A small watchdog, they will alert your family of any intruder or danger.  The downside is to this protective nature is persistent barking.  Early training is encouraged.  Schnauzers do not shed and you have three sizes to choose from; giant, standard and miniature.

Yorkshire Small Breed Hypoallergenic dogs

Yorkshire Terrier: This is the perfect choice for those who may be lacking a yard for their new friend to run in.  These guys are perfectly content playing indoors with you and cuddling up in your lap, but don’t worry, you won’t end up covered in dog hair as these little guys do not shed and have minimal dander.  Due to their long hair, they do require lots of brushing to keep them soft and free of knots. Read our Yorkshire Terrier Breed complete feature.

Small Breed Hypoallergenic dogs: Poodle

Poodle: Poodles are great dogs and what you may not know is that, like the Schnauzer, have three sizes to choose from; standard, mini and toy.  Whatever size you choose, they do not shed, but do require lots of grooming.  Poodles are a great family choice as they are easy to train!  If you are not quite taken with a Poodle, you can try the Labradoodle; a labrador body but with the Poodle coat. Either way you will still be comfortable when it comes to your allergies.

Shih Tzu Small Breed Hypoallergenic dogs

Shih Tzu: Now, not all dogs are kid-friendly, and this is one of them.  They tend to be jealous of babies and toddlers.  While they do require lots of grooming due to their long hair, they do not shed.  A smaller breed, so they do well in apartment living, or a place where you do not have access to a yard at all times.

chinese crested Small Breed Hypoallergenic dogs

Chinese Crested: This small dog can be found by your side, as they can be sort of clingy in nature.  Your family will be free of dog hair, as this little one does not shed and produces little dander.  Very good with kids, the Chinese Crested is a great addition to your family as they are playful, happy and sweet-tempered by nature. Read our Chinese Crested dog breedfeature.

This is just a short list of small breed hypoallergenic dogs that are wonderful for people with allergies.   Dogs are a great addition to any family.  They help you stay active and are wonderful companions for the kids.  Do you or a family member have allergies and have chosen a new four legged friend not listed?  Let us know in the comments section!

http://www.dogvills.com/best-small-breed-hypoallergenic-dogs/

You and your best friend don’t have to live with pain!

Our product covers dogs of all ages and breeds, which encounter joint problems with age, need some post-op help to regain mobility or highly active dogs suffering from joint inflammation and pain after a hard day on the job or the trail. FidoActive Advanced Hip and Joint Supplement for Dogs supports joint health for dogs to get your four-legged friend back on their paws again. Get Fido active again the simple, safe way and treat your dog to a long & active life! Shop now and enjoy 10% off!!!

Last Few Days To Take Advantage of 10% Valentine’s Discount

Coupon Code : K37RCTMZ

Amazon Link – here

Learn More About FidoActive- here

Best Hypoallergenic Small Dog Breeds

 

Walk Your Dog Day!

Grab a leash and hit the streets, National Walk your Dog day is February 22. Whether you have a dog, a cat, or just like to get outside for a stroll, a daily walk comes with a number of benefits. It is a great excuse to go outside and get some extra exercise, and now with charitable apps like Wooftrax’s Walk for a Dog App, you can give back to your local shelter at the same time. Dr. Kerri Marshall, veterinarian and chief veterinary officer at Trupanion highlights some of the best reasons to walk with your pet.

#1 – A daily walking routine keeps both you and your pet healthy.

Dogs need exercise in order to stay healthy in the long run, and the same is true for people. Regular walks can help reduce destructive behavior, maintain a pet’s healthy weight, and help your pet stay mentally happy and healthy.

Image source: @FaceMePLS via Flickr

Image source: @FaceMePLS via Flickr

#2 – Walks are a great way to bond with your pet and get them the exercise they need.

Walking with your pet helps solidify the bond you have and allows you to experience new environments together. Dogs that are walked in new places meet new people and experience new things, which makes them a better socialized and good canine citizens.

Image source: @FaceMePLS via Flickr

Image source: @FaceMePLS via Flickr

#3 – A daily walk lets you and your pet get the social interaction you both need.

Both dogs and people are social beings that need to get out regularly. Some dogs can benefit from spending time with other dogs, and an occasional trip to a designated dog park can be a great way to socialize. Pets are also a good icebreaker when meeting new people.

Image source: @SkirtPR via Flickr

Image source: @SkirtPR via Flickr

#4 – Walking reduces stress and relieves anxiety in both people and pets.

Walking a pet has been shown to reduce blood pressure and boost the immune system. In addition, petting a dog or cat can calm frayed nerves and alleviate stress. Pets also benefit mentally and physiologically from some exercise and time spent outside.

Image source: @TonyFischer via Flickr

Image source: @TonyFischer via Flickr

#5 – Giving back is as simple as taking a walk.

Wooftrax’s Walk for a Dog app allows you to raise money for shelter pets simply by taking a stroll. Whether or not you have a pet, a simple walk around the block can help you earn much-needed funds for a local shelter of your choice. Looking to give back to a local shelter simply by taking a stroll? You can download Walk for a Dog for your Android or iPhone.

You and your best friend don’t have to live with pain!

Our product covers dogs of all ages and breeds, which encounter joint problems with age, need some post-op help to regain mobility or highly active dogs suffering from joint inflammation and pain after a hard day on the job or the trail. FidoActive Advanced Hip and Joint Supplement for Dogs supports joint health for dogs to get your four-legged friend back on their paws again. Get Fido active again the simple, safe way and treat your dog to a long & active life! Shop now and enjoy 10% off!!!

Last Few Days To Take Advantage of 10% Valentine’s Discount

Coupon Code : K37RCTMZ

Amazon Link – here

Learn More About FidoActive- here

Walk Your Dog Day!